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Eating Disorders

 

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In the United States, as many as 10 million females and 1 million males are fighting a life-and-death battle with an eating disorder such as anorexia or bulimia. Are you or is someone you love systematically starving themselves? Or do you binge and purge? Share your stories and get support here.

If you or someone you love is suffering with an eating disorder, check out these resources.
Comments
Replied By: rlb1995 on Mar 25, 2014, 8:53AM
If someone was to be diagnosed as having an "eating disorder" what exactly does that mean? This person does eats small portions (for example in a day they will have a hot chocolate and some mash potato), but they are still eating so why do they think she has an eating disorder and why won't they listen to her when she tells them she is fine?
 
Replied By: docdaye1 on Jan 30, 2014, 1:29PM
When I was or am enmeshed in my eating disorder, I believe it keeps me safe and in control, and makes me desirable. I thought it was there to protect me from myself.”I was wrong.



I suffered from a crippling eating disorder from the age of twelve (I am now 41 yrs old). It robbed me of any life outside of it. As it robbed me of my appearance, my skin, my touch, sight, smell and sound and many other aspects of my life. The moment I woke, my thoughts were dictated by it:  Did I eat too much the day before? What would I have to do to compensate for it? Would I show myself to people today or would I hide from the world until I was thin enough? The eating disorder demanded and I followed, never questioning it.  I missed out on social opportunities because the eating disorder would tell me I was not good enough… I missed out on experiencing my surroundings wherever I went – Even when I did go out into the world, I can’t tell you what I saw because everywhere I went the eating disorder followed. I missed out on relationships because the eating disorder told me I wasn’t worthy.  I missed out on living because I was too busy dying by listening to my eating disorder. Again, the eating disorder promised me a better life all while taking it away.


My recovery started when I realized that I couldn’t go on doing what the eating disorder was asking of me. Slowly, I began to question what it was telling me. With ever question (although at first it was very hard to do), I began to discover that the eating disorder was not only ugly, but it was a liar too. Each opportunity I got as I went through life, I immediately checked in with my body, and the eating disorder shut me down, ,by telling me to ...Say no and don’t waste your time, you won’t get far with it anyway. I knew that for sometime, quite a while, I had been growing sick and tired of being dictated to by this feeling of unworthiness. I had begun to recognize what was happening in my relationship with the eating disorder, just like many of my other relationships. I started to realize that just because my "ED" made a ton of noise when I went against the direction given, I still had the choice to change things and say no.

The eating disorder constantly wanted to jump in, throughout my stages of recovery but with every question I asked myself, I abruptly cut its voice off. I had become willing to wait and let the facts reveal themselves instead of beating myself up with lies. I started to promise myself to have confidence and try to trust myself and not allow the eating disorder to come in. Although I faced many roller coasters throughout my life with ED, and through recovery I was always able to bounce back, even knowing it would somehow end in disaster I kept going, until I could finally see myself, as my true self.


The truth is: it took patience and time in order to catch the lies of the eating disorder. It also took willingness to feel uncomfortable during those times of challenging it. I have found that change is both painful and worth it. I worked with specialists in the eating disorder field and got support by like-minded people who also desperately wanted to recover. Sometimes I fell in my recovery, but I got back up and wiped myself off. I began to refuse to listen to the noise of the eating disorder and each time I did this I gained a little bit of myself back.  My biggest tool was reminding myself that the eating disorder asked me to be perfect while it robbed me of dignity, self and just about everything. Because it’s a liar and a thief. Once I discovered this about the eating disorder it became very difficult to trust it in the way I once had.


Today, I have some recovery, behind me...some relapse, some days are better than others, but I want you to know that I am grateful to be perfectly imperfect and full of human shortcomings. I want you to also know that I now think about my dreams, hopes, passions and purpose instead of the eating disorders demands.  I want you to know, that even if you don’t believe it, that eating disorder recovery is doable and possible… and your life is waiting.

This is my story, my life, what is behind me and infront of me...I share this to help, but also because it has taken a tremendous toll on my body and my skin and I continually look for ways to help regain some youth that was stripped from my appearance.

I hope to spend my life helping and sharing for the hope to touch as many infected lives as I possibly can. This is my purpose and I hope to be flourished with beauty in doing so.

Thank you so much for reading my story, I may not be chosen for the line of Jacqueline's Beauty products, But, I can touch another life, which is the world to me.

My best,
Daye
 
Replied By: elvenfairy on Jan 20, 2014, 9:29AM
The hardest thing about treatment for things like Annorexia is that all of the treatment programs expect you to put your life on hold and live in their facility for weeks at a time.  How can they expect people to be able to drop everything and get treatment?  I have classes to do, family to care for, a house to mind, a job to attend.  Yet these places act as if it's the most natural or easy thing in the world to cast all that asside to be part of their program?  It's no wonder to me why people like myself can't get help!  The universe isn't going to stop and wait patiently while I have doctors help me stop batteling with myself about something like food and my body immage.  The world just doesn't work like that.


Then in addition, no one takes my insurance either.  So even if I did somehow manage to put my life asside, I'd never be able to afford it.  One place I called said it costs $4.000 a WEEK.  I don't make that much money in two MONTHS, never mind a week.



Any advice anyone?
 
Replied By: advicewelcome on Jan 20, 2014, 7:59AM - In reply to integrityhouse
Mr. Dekker, thank you for sharing your experience. Knowing that you are a professional in dealing with eating disorder I was just curious why I was not on my last breath as you had described that 5'6 100 lb 15 year old girl. I am an average 5'5 and lived years at 70lbs. Of course there have to be things internally at crisis but I don't see it. 

I have never sought help because of cultural and financial reasons and have been anorexic and bulemic for 11 years. From everyone's stories I feel like I fall below the weight mean for even people who suffer from eating disorders. Why am I still ok? Why am I not on my "last breath" like people you have taken into your facility? Any insight is well appreciated. Thank you. 

 
Replied By: ksumama on Jan 17, 2014, 1:47PM
I am a 35 year old, married, mother of two beautiful children.  I am currently battling anorexia.  At first I was just an overweight woman who finally got it together and was taking all the right avenues to lose weight and get healthy.  And then it just started spiriling out of control.  I am currently in therapy weekly, meet with a nurtritionist weekly and have to see my doctor weekly.  I am barely managing to keep myself out of inpatient therapy but I am determined not to have to leave my kids and husband.  I struggle every minute of every day but I do feel the anorexia's grip on me getting a little weaker.  I take each day one hour at a time and try to celebrate the "baby steps".  This is a vicious illness that cannot be understood unless you have been sucked in its darkness.  I just wish I could find a support group or something for my husband to attend.  This is SO hard for him to watch but yet he remains my rock constantly.  I could not do this without him. 
 
Replied By: rebel4life on Jan 17, 2014, 1:27PM
I've had an eating disorder for year. No body in my family caught on. I was living with a friend during those two years. This friend was mentally and verablly abuse, calling me fat and lazy.. so I took matters into my own hands( so I thought) I took to bulima as my weapon.. eating then making myself vomit. Im now 25 years old with a beautiful daughter. I've over come my eating diorder. So in my oppinion, Yes eating disorder can be over came.. its all in the mind.
 
Replied By: alexandria1991 on Jan 14, 2014, 5:57PM
I think eating disorders can be managed. I have been managing mine for years and I'm perfectly healthy. I binge and purge sometimes but prefer to use laxatives or just not eat. I am perfectly healthy. Those girls took it to extremes and they do have a problem. They didn't do it right or over did it. Common sense says if you are draining your body of resources like water and vitamins, drink water and take some multiviatmins.
 
Replied By: heartworried on Nov 6, 2013, 2:48PM - In reply to cgisonda
thank u.
 
Replied By: missdaphne on Nov 5, 2013, 1:00PM
Sometimes I feel like my life has been like a game of "Whack-a-Mole." I have replaced one addictive behavior with another, over and over again, throughout my life.  Binge eating and extreme dieting/exercise.  Workaholism, nicotine addiction, alcoholism.  Anything to not feel my feelings.   I am 56 years old now, and am in recovery, thanks to god and AA, and finally feel like I'm growing up--better late than never!  :-)   


It does seem to me that all of these behaviors are related.  I read a great book by Christopher Kennedy Lawford, about why we addictive personalities move from one "high" or "numb-out" to another.  Think it would be a great show topic, at some point.  Was watching the news this morning about the Toronto Mayor, admitting that he smoked crack when he was drunk out of his mind, and also needed to get his act together and lose 100 pounds.  I could relate to him 100%.  Obviously a successful guy, Mayor of a major city, and his accomplishments are clearly not enough to make him comfortable in his own skin.
 
Replied By: kirsten1087 on Nov 5, 2013, 10:25AM - In reply to amandah79
this is how I started--now 43 and struggling with same issues--it's terrible.  I wish my mom had forced me to go to a therapist every single week!!! I needed Prozac and skills to cope.  HELP HER--it's a huge, lifelong thing--if she had diabetes you would give her insuline--same thing.  I so wish I could go back and have this conversation with teenager me-you have the chance to fix it!(((HUGS)))
 
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