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2014 Shows

 
For more than a year, 65-year-old widow Gilda says she has been in a romantic relationship with “Eric,” whom she met online and has yet to meet in person or even speak to over the phone. She admits she’s sent Eric tens of thousands of dollars -- nearly draining her life savings and even selling the family home, in part, to come up with the funds. She says "Eric" has promised to pay her back, as soon as he returns to the U.S. from London. Gilda’s sons, Paul and Cary, and daughter-in-law, Linda, believe Gilda has fallen victim to a catfish, or online imposter, and they fear she’ll end up bankrupt and homeless. Cary says his mom has been acting like a lovesick teenager -- hiding her cell phone to conceal her communications with "Eric", lying about what she’s doing and where she’s going -- and even sending "Eric" topless photos! He says he has gotten so frustrated that he has kicked her out of his home. Is Gilda being duped? Dr. Phil enlists the help of private investigator Doug Kane to track down details on “Eric.” Plus, he has two surprises for Gilda. Is she ready for the truth? And, tune in tomorrow to see what happens when Dr. Phil confronts a catfish, in-studio. Why did she carry out such a deception? (OAD: 10-30-13)

Find out what happened on the show.
Comments
Replied By: lrm688 on Jun 15, 2014, 11:24PM
I actually wad on match.com and had a scammer try and scam me. He had several names. I noticed after we had several conversations online, he told me how important I was, how he was in love with me, and wanted to marry me. I could only laugh at this or  does this man really love me. He made sure he told me what I wanted to hear, being I was recently separated. Vulnerable.. I would say after a couple of weeks gee started telling me he was in Afghanistan, in the Army, had no access to his money. He said he had a daughter, it was her birthday, could I send her a gift. I said, "NO" and he would get mad. Tell me I didn't love him. He even asked for money for a phone, for money to come. I know men in the Army, they have full access to their money and internet. His names were Handy Williams, Anthony Williams, and one other. I saw him on several sites after, he lives in so many different cities. I told him I was going to turn him in, he cussed me out. I posted him online ad a scammer, and when I pulled his name up on Google, omg I was so surprise ay what I found out about him. So now on I won't chat with anyone when they start telling me they are in the army and in another country.  He even requested me on Facebook, and then cussed me out. I have had to block him. It's sad that these people are out there.
 
Replied By: truebennett99 on Jun 5, 2014, 8:22PM - In reply to lagana619
Do not give him any money for any reason. If he tells you he can recover your money, fine, but do NOT give him a single dime. EVER.
 
Replied By: itourist on Jun 4, 2014, 9:37AM
I cannot believe this woman will stop sending money to catfishes.  It was absolutely selfish what she did.  She did not listen to her sons or any type of common sense.  Does the love drug excuse such a monumental wrong?  She is their mother.  So they can love her.  But I think it would be good to keep kids away from her.  I cannot think this is a one time judgement lapse.  If her sons do not mean much to her, then her grandchildren won't either.  The lack of consideration could not be good for the grandkids.
 
Replied By: upsydasy on May 30, 2014, 10:17AM - In reply to lindabrid
The one thing that stands out to me is the incredible stubbornness of these women despite overwhelming evidence that they’re being scammed.  When Dr. Phil read some of the text messages back to Gilda verbatim, she replied at least twice:  “well if you put it that way”, as though she were hearing them or reading them along with him for the first time.  For example, even though she only had $28 or so left in her pocket for groceries, her scammer demanded another grand or he’d break things off.  Of course her family is furious with her and why shouldn’t they be?  She was smart enough to lie to them repeatedly, but too selfish to stop.  Why would she even do that if she didn’t believe a least on some level that this was all a fantasy, which she persistently refused to drop?  I can only imagine how frustrated they must feel now that all of her savings along with the family home are gone forever and so is the fake boyfriend.  I’ve read numerous posts similar to yours defending these women’s actions by stating their scammers are just brilliant at fooling them and that it could happen to anyone, which is complete nonsense.  Unless you’ve been declared certifiably insane, nobody is THAT stupid unless you want to be.  Otherwise, I think it’s time to call the guys in white coats and pass around the butterfly nets – the world has gone completely mad.

 
Replied By: valerieshane on May 29, 2014, 9:12PM
For as many shows that I've watched Dr. Phil, I don't think I've ever seen him so far from the mark than this episode. Those twin sisters have created their own misery. They misse an opportunity to be happy with the new Step-Mom and embrace their new step-siblings. That opportunity was lost, hurtful and now gone forever. It did sound like the Dad didn't communicate enough about his new life and the changes coming. Someone would need to ask the Father why he's never had a voice with them. It looks like he didn't and still doesn't. Grieving doesn't give them the right to pre-judge Veronica and be offended at the Dad moving forward. Perhaps they could have had support from this new family unit. Instead they stood in jealousy and their own beliefs and perceptions. How terrible for the new family! They've demonstrated to me, pure selfishness. Dr. Phil made a huge mistake by not asking the daughters to go to work on themselves BEFORE working on the rebuild. Without work, they will always watch and critique them, keep track, measure, etc. And so, the Father and his (hardly new) family do not stand a chance. It will not take them long to find a problem. The girls should be expected to make up for it by going beyond 'average' behaviors. That's called Reparation. My guess is that they will go back to exactly the way they have behaving and the old and new family will never be complete. Dr. Phil, you have had it too good for too long in your own family unit and do not now how terrible this experience has been for the Dad, his new wife and the step-children. I'm sure if you were to ever follow up, you will see how useless this meeting was.
 
Replied By: pattyb928 on May 29, 2014, 7:21PM - In reply to kenya33
You need to get power of attorney, or your son should! I bet you could talk her into it, like for paying her bills, etc. I REALLY think your husband needs to get on this. Is  he a "silent signer" on her bank accounts? I was, on both of my mom and dad's accounts. (They were divorced.)

You have all kinds of options! It can't be that hard to keep ahead of an 86 year old lady! I would have to think awhile to help you out, but I think the best idea is to get ahold of an attorney who deals only with seniors.

They are out there, just look in your local phone book. An appointment with one of them would certainly be cheaper than getting fleeced by some catfish! Keep us posted on how you are doing! Good luck!

 
Replied By: glasscutter7 on May 29, 2014, 7:09PM
I am not convinced that she will stop sending him money.  She looks like she heard what was being said, but in the end she still looked like she wants to believe that there is love there.  She may confront the guy and he "fesses up" about the lie with some huge story that she will buy hook line and sinker.
 
Replied By: kenya33 on May 29, 2014, 6:38PM
Dr. Phil this very same thing has been happening to my 86 year old mil. My husband  his siblings, grandchild and myself have been tirelessly working on this together.  We disconnected internet, phone, and television thru Verizon because he had actually attached his email address to her Verizon acct and each time we tried to change it it would shoot the new number thru Verizon.  We put precautions in place over her annuity acct so her requests would have to go thru two people notarized with written request. After this she was able to get more money out.  So many unbelievable aspects to this case....I could go on and on. She has started onset dementia and has always been stubborn. So how much we can believe when she tells us she can't remember. We have found this man's number and she keeps making comments she wants to call and give him her piece of mind. Nope not a good idea..she won't listen and hides his number all over. Still dealing...thanks for this show I'm gonna make her watch it.  Karen
 
Replied By: alwaysaskeptic on May 29, 2014, 6:28PM - In reply to cdrens
cdrens, I'm glad you enjoyed the post and I'm glad to know all in Saskatoon are not as gullible as Gilda. She had as much blind optimism as any die-hard Leafs fan! But I think it would still be the RCMP who'd be trying to help her out. CSIS is our version of the CIA, dealing with national security issues. The RCMP have an internet crime division and I'm sure cooperate with other national and international police forces when the internet crimes originate offshore.  Go Habs Go!
 
Replied By: scooterlittle on May 29, 2014, 5:48PM
Put him in jail! If I had the money I would.
 
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