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2013 Shows

 
(Original Air Date: 10/18/12) Matt and Melanie adopted Veronica after her birth mom handpicked them to be her parents. When Veronica’s biological father, Dusten, was notified about the adoption four months later, he decided he wanted to raise her, even though he had little involvement during the pregnancy and with the birth mother since Veronica’s birth. Dusten, who is part Cherokee Indian, was able to reclaim his daughter pursuant to the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), which was enacted “to protect the best interests of Indian children and to promote the stability and security of Indian tribes and families.” Devastated, Matt and Melanie petitioned the United States Supreme Court to regain custody of Veronica. Should she be returned to them, or should she remain with her biological father? Dr. Phil, along with Troy Dunn, who has reunited thousands of lost loved ones on his hit TV show The Locator, delves into this controversial story. And, Chrissi Nimmo, assistant attorney general for the Cherokee Nation, and Les Marston, attorney and tribal judge, explain why they believe Veronica’s father is the best person to raise her. Then, find out why Johnston, who adopted two boys who are part American Indian, says the ICWA is racist, unjust and hurts children.

Find out what happened on the show.
Comments
Replied By: viewergrandma on Nov 19, 2013, 1:29AM
The legal battle aside, the racial issue aside, there was a better way to handle the exchange of the child from one home/parent to the other for the sake of the baby.  Equal visitation would have prevented trauma for Veronica while the battle rages on.  You cause no harm providing more love.  What happened to common sense?
 
Replied By: rezchik on Oct 30, 2013, 10:12AM - In reply to youngwolf
I also wanted to respond to your part where I insinuated that living on the reservation was a horrid place.
That is the view of outsiders. I said people paint a picture that living on the reservation is a horrible place. I lived on a nice farm on the reservation....and that's what I stated. I think you need to re-read my posts. I was trying to educate people that ICWF existed because of illegal adoptions and children being taken away from Native families to go to boarding school. with that in mind, the government needs to uphold the laws for Native's. Also how living on the reservation is a great place not horrible.
 
Replied By: rezchik on Oct 30, 2013, 10:02AM - In reply to youngwolf
Mr Youngwolf, if you read my opinion very carefully, I sided with our Native culture. I explained why the Indian Child Welfare act existed. As I said our laws were put in place for a reason, and that should be honored. I am all for our Native laws, no one should say it's a stupid law or worthless law, if they don't understand why it was created. These boys were obviously told that they were part Indian, and I am pretty sure they were shown what the reservations looked like. So for you to say I am on their side, NOT! I am on the side of our people, and they have every right to educate these folks on these laws.
 
Replied By: sbrooks103 on Oct 30, 2013, 8:54AM
When the father gave up his rights it was because he thought she wanted the baby. If she didn't want the baby she should have signed over rights to him. He never would have given up his rights if he knew she was going to give up the baby.
 
Replied By: nataleeh12 on Oct 29, 2013, 6:20PM
To whom it may concern,

I have been on the other end where the judicial system has failed me.  I am 25 and haven't had my child in around 2-3 yrs.  In the mean time, I have went through rehabilitiation services, gained a fiance, a child, and three step-children.  My daughter is with my step-sister but doesn't even know me as her mother.  I did exactly what the system told me to and later realized they manipulated me to make sure that my sister, who cannot have children but desperately wanted a blonded-haired daughter, got custody despite my best efforts.  I understand that the circumstances are considerably different and I have no real understanding of the situation, but I still understand a biological parents' concern.  I just wish everyone would realize that they have no idea the real circumstances and maybe even consider the biological father has any sincere intentions?? I have to say that I don't think this 2 year old child should be spread all over the media because three ADULTS can't maybe put their feelings aside and advocate for a child.  Ugh.....
 
Replied By: youngwolf on Sep 24, 2013, 7:53AM - In reply to rezchik
I am going to put this into perspective, from a Cherokee point of view. The dominant society is ignorant of Native American cultures at best. We are leery of them. After all, we have lived in the same country with them long enough to know how they treat us. They have never held any regard for our cultures since the 1400s. Among the laws that these early whites broke are murder, slavery, human trafficking, theft, arson and genocide.They have broken nearly every treaty they wrote and now they are trying to squirm out of obeying their own law. It amazes me how terrible they are at keeping promises.


When those boys were asked if they wanted to live on a reservation, how could they have known what that meant? They could not, any more than your audience really knew what the Indian Child Welfare Act is. A bit biased wouldn't you say?


I live on the Qualla Boundary in Cherokee, NC, otherwise known as an Indian reservation for the convenience of those who could not conceive of Indians owning their own sovereign country, but It is not a reservation because it is land purchased by the Cherokee. There is not a more beautiful place to live, with close family, community and fellowship. Jobs are so plentiful that we are the largest employer in Western NC. The way I am hearing it on here, I picture a dry dusty barren landscape with hovels on it. Why are you insinuating that life on a reservation is so horrible. It is wonderful.


Our children should live among our people. How will the culture of our people survive if our children could not experience it and pass it on. How could we have more Cherokee if they do not marry and have Cherokee children? We lose a tiny bit of our culture with each child lost to adoption into the outside world. Let this child be at home and leave her alone. 


Oh but thats right, you are on their side.
 
Replied By: rezchik on Sep 16, 2013, 11:23AM
I just want to say this, First of all, for all these folks who think think these by the Native American Government is Stupid! Let us not forget, Alot of these laws were set up between the Native Americans and American Governemnt when the Sovereign Nations were established. Native Americans were ushered onto Reservations, because Whites came onto this land and started establishing colonies because they thought they owned this land. They did not care that the Native Americans already lived here. So, they took their lands, started taking their children without the parents permission and ushering them into boarding schools and forced not to speak their languages as well as forced to live with white families and forced to learn so called proper etiquette-----according to whose standards, i don't know (Europeans).  So with this Native Americans/Government came up treaties for the Native Americans....which the whites renigged on majority of the treaties, so we tried to take back which we were promised---in returned were called "Indian Givers". So, out of this came the The Adoption Law, because of the illegal adoptions of native american children.....hmmmmm. So all of this crying of the law is wrong by whites, is the same law that prevents  wrongful adoptions of native american kids  was created by the Government. One person described the Native Americans as "heathens" on this site, and another as the law as keeping native american kids "trapped" on reservations. WOW!!!! As a Navajo/Christian, and born/raised on the reservation for 18 years of my life I am neither. People have such a poor view of native's and the reservation it is sooo sad! When I watched this show, what really got me was when Dr. Phil asked the two boys if they would ever like to live on the reservation, with a look of disgust and smirkiness they were like "NO".....the parents were like they are proud of their Indian Heritage. Well if they were, I believe their answer would of been, maybe some day, i don't mind visiting and getting to know my family. I am proud of my heritage, and i am proud i lived on the reservation, and still go  back often to see my family. The military took me away to see other parts of the world which i am very grateful for. So people do not be so self-centered and disgusted. You need to have a love for ALL people and gracious attitude.
 
Replied By: rezchik on Sep 16, 2013, 11:01AM - In reply to paulab12
HEATHENS!!!!! For your information, not all Native's are heathens. If anything, you are no better than the people you are pointing fingers at that you don't know anything about. What you just established is hatred and ingnorance. As a Navajo/Christian who lived 18 years of my life on the Navajo Reservation and has met lots of other Native's who are very good people. Laws were established on the Reservations for a reason to prevent illegal adoptions due to the fact, that children were unlawfully taken from their parents back in the day when they were hauled off to boarding schools and shoved off to live with white folks against their parents wishes. These treaties were put together by the Native Americans and American Government when the Sovereign Nations were established. So for people to say that the Natives have no right to use these laws, and are heathens and are Indian Givers. It's the Whites who are at fault, because they take everything back that was promised to the Native American people and think they are more superior and are entitled to everything else.
 
Replied By: rezchik on Sep 16, 2013, 10:47AM - In reply to wilburfamily
I find your term "trapped" to be offensive. As a Native American, Navajo to be exact who has lived on the Reservation for 18 years of my life, never felt trapped. That was my home, just like your home as you live in the city or suburbs. I'm so sick and tired of people thinking that the reservation is a horrid place for children or families to live. It's what you make of it. I had a nice home, with running water, electricity and a huge farm. Granted it may not have been a pituresque home with a nice white picket fence with grass, flowers and a paved street. But I had a home, with a loving family. So stop painting the reservation a mouse trap!
 
Replied By: rezchik on Sep 16, 2013, 10:47AM - In reply to wilburfamily
I find your term "trapped" to be offensive. As a Native American, Navajo to be exact who has lived on the Reservation for 18 years of my life, never felt trapped. That was my home, just like your home as you live in the city or suburbs. I'm so sick and tired of people thinking that the reservation is a horrid place for children or families to live. It's what you make of it. I had a nice home, with running water, electricity and a huge farm. Granted it may not have been a pituresque home with a nice white picket fence with grass, flowers and a paved street. But I had a home, with a loving family. So stop painting the reservation a mouse trap!
 
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