Sign up for the Dr. Phil Newsletter
Twitter Facebook YouTube

2012 Shows

 
(Original Air Date: 02/09/12) How did 21-year-old Jenna go from being a straight-A UC Berkeley student and former beauty queen to sleeping in a drug house and being used as sexual currency? She says her life began to spiral out of control when she became addicted to heroin and meth. Since then, Jenna's mom, Ann, says her only child has been in and out of rehab and goes missing for weeks at a time. Desperate to save her daughter, she turned to Dr. Phil. With the help of recovering addict and former Dr. Phil guest Brandon and his mom, Debbie, an intervention is arranged. But when confronted by her friends and family, how does Jenna respond? Does she take the offer for help to heart? And, what role does Ann play in her daughter's addiction? Is her unwavering support jeopardizing her daughter's chances to get clean? Dr. Phil and Debbie lay it on the line for Ann, whom they believe is an enabling mom. Then, Jenna's former classmate and friend, John, suffered a heart attack -- after allegedly ingesting alcohol, cocaine and marijuana -- that left him with permanent brain damage. His mom, Madelyn, alleges Jenna introduced him to cocaine. Does Jenna blame herself for what happened to John? When one person is addicted, it affects the entire family. Tune in to get Dr. Phil's steps to creating a healthy home environment for someone struggling with or recovering from substance abuse.

Find out what happened on the show.
Comments
Replied By: songwriterlive on Nov 14, 2012, 9:32PM
In South Africa we only see the Dr Phil show months after it's screened in America. I often feel compelled to respond to what I see, though, so I hope it's "better late than never".

This is about show S10/E109.

This mother says she wants to stop her daughter dying but doesn't want her to come to the house looking the way she does. What's wrong with this picture? I was horrified. This woman's image is more important to her than her child's health.

The child, Jenna, is determined to destroy herself to punish her mother for her emotional neglect. It's her way of showing outwardly what's been done to her inwardly.

I recommend reading books by Alice Miller, renowned psychoanalyst, for greater insight into how to stop this toxic cycle in its tracks.
 
Replied By: timewarp80 on Sep 3, 2012, 9:07AM
I was so irritated by the mother! She is manipulative just like the daugther. I was so irritated by her fake crying about everyhting. I think the daugther definately deserves the chance she is getting, but I think the mother feels more sorry for herself then that she is interested in helping her. Mother is trying to sound like a victim herself, while she is enables all of it. Maybe she shouldn't talk about her daugther being man ipulative, because she is fake.
 
Replied By: debbie7112 on Jul 30, 2012, 12:22PM
My daughter has been clean 1 year Wed. Aug 1st. and I am so proud of her. In regards to this mother, until you have lived this role as a mother of an addict I don't believe anyone has the right to judge. It is the most painful and difficult experiance of a life time. I am not going to point out where I agree or disagree with the things this mother said or did but I will point out that before my daughter was an addict I thought I would have handled things differently too. It was easy to say right and wrong when it is not your life or child. I think most parents are in some form of denial at least in the beginning. I have blammed myself for my daughters addiction and have questioned many of my choices. It took a long time to let it all go and pray it would work out and as I've already said she is amazing and doing so well. I think Jenna's mother needs counseling and should attend meetings for parents of addicts so that when the time comes and Jenna is well and at home the same way of living is not repeated. That is what is now important. I believe it was mentioned that this family lives in PA and I would like to post an amazing facility located on the NY PA boarder..it is called New Hope Manor and is the best woman facilities I have seen. My daughter too was kicked out of or left places before New Hope but it was there that she was giving the tools she needed for success. Also I feel it is important to know that she had finally decided to get serious about getting well. My daughter and her 2 friends, by coincidence only, were in the hospital trying to detox on the same day 2 years ago. Today only 1 of those 3 are alive, my daughter is the 1 alive. That is a cold hard fact and the fact that my daughter chose the hard long road of recovery is an awsome accomplishment for her. Lets stop bashing this mom and lets give her the tools she needs to help her daughter with her recovery. Is Dr. Phil helping with that or did he just want to be hard on this mom and not help her as well. I'm hopeful that she has been given some help as well. It is a long hard road and one that nobody should have to walk alone. NOt the addict and not the family of the addict.
 
Replied By: debbie7112 on Jul 30, 2012, 12:03PM
I just had the chance to view this show and wanted to share a story that will give the mother and others involved with Jenna some hope. My daughter is also a drug addict who is now 23 and clean for 1 year this Wed. Aug. 1st. Let me say I am so proud of my daughter and her accomplishments. She has fought and will continue to fight a long, hard road. At around age 19 she began using heroin and yes surprise surprise to all the people that are condemning Jenna's mother. I too was in denial for awhile and like her I said it was not denial I was trying to process it all and figure out what was happening. I would search my daughters room and get in her face about what was going on. When she began using it was oxycotin and it was not until later that it was heroin, but as I know now oxycotin is heroin or just as addicting with the same painful withdrawl. I did not know what this drug looked like. Meaning I did not know how a person looked or acted while high on this drug. It wasn't until my daughter was arrested and in big trouble with the law that I finally took a stand and did something to get her help weather she got mad at me or not. I wrote a letter to the judge begging him not to put her in jail, explaining to him that she was not a crimmanl but a drug addict. I wrote to him that because of her age I could not put her into rehab and I explained that it was her need for drugs that she committed the crimes. Soon she was arrested again and this time she was
 
Replied By: hawaiimom on Jul 27, 2012, 3:47PM
My daughter is 19 to be 20 in September.  After graduating high school she moved to another island to attend school. She lived for free with my family member attended school and worked two part time jobs.She was doing well but was frustrated that there were rules at home.  She eventually moved out and thats when it all started.  She began going out with friends and frequenting a gay bar that served alcohol to 21 and under.
I believe she was then drugged and began befriending a gay female.  Eventually over time i noticed her makeup started getting darker and heavier.  She quit one parttime job (with a good enough reason that she gave me), then took a quater off from school, then began calling me long distance to call in sick for her, as she began having anxiety attacks that were coming on more frequent.  In this two month period  i was noticing a change in my daughter.  After one night of having 3 anxiety attacks she ended up in a mental rehabilitation hospital.  Being over 18 years of age I had no information as to what was happening to my daughter, only what she would tell me.  Which was limited.  I later discovered from her room mate/cousin that My daughters new "friend" was a self proclaimed "Pimp" and a drug dealer.  My Daughters cousin said that she was giving my daughter different RX drugs and street drugs.  I looked this girl up on Facebook and discovered that she previously dated another young woman who has seem to be in the same life style that my daughter was heading.  She moved to LV to be a stripper, was also previously in the same mental rehab hospital and abused street and RX drugs.  I believe that this gay female was trying to  prepare my daughter for the sex industry.  She convinced my daughter that she was the only one who cared for her and would take care of her as no one in her family did.  She was setting her up to be economically dependant on her to eventually see that working the streets would be an option for money.  I have since moved my daughter back home with me.  But my daughter continues to keep open contact with this gay woman and seems to still be in her grips.  My daughter still suffers with an anxiety disorder but does not have attacks as she did while living away.  She is depressed and distant from the family like NEVER BEFORE.  My daughter has changed.  She was always popular and self motivated.  She seems insecure now and timid now.  She is under doctors care, but refuses to take zolof that was prescribed to her.  Makes me sad to see her this way~
 
Replied By: allenleslie47 on Jul 24, 2012, 1:43PM
I am just getting to see the episode of Dr. Phil with the girl Jenna who is definitely an addict.  I can honestly say i have never seen a mother in such denile and seem so fake.  This woman did not seem genuine or true at all what so ever.  I am a recovered drug addict myself and have been clean for over five years.  This subject is something that is very important to me and is definitely a passion.  I currently work as a massage therapist at a drug and achohol facility and have seen so many people go through recovery.  I have seen people fail and suceed at recovery and it is by far an easy road.  But the mother of Jenna needs serious help.  I truely hope that Jenna has taken advantage of the help that Dr. Phil has given her.  There are so many people who dont get and could never even fathom the help that Dr. Phil has given her.  Its extremely sad that this issue isnt addressed more seriously and loudly in this country.  The United States is leading in addiction in everyway!!!!!!!!  I wish that i could share my storey more in schools or anywhere possible.  Children need to be educated and talked to about having someone they can talk to about anything and everything.  Addiction I believe starts with us a person wanting to numb or cover some type of pain or something that has happened to us.  Everyone needs to be able to talk about these things, this is the only way we can even begin to put a dent in addiction problems in this country.  I wish kids and people in general could see the ending of addiction before they even start.  It is a dead end street and will never end well.  Im not saying anything that hasnt already been said.  I just sincerely hope this girl takes advantage of this or she will end up ten feet under, no doubt.  Second her mother needs to get real!!!!!!!!!  I wish both of them the best, I hope that Jenna is making progress.   She has a long road ahead.  Addiction is a never ending battle.  I truely believe that everyone has their vice, what sets us apart is how we use that vice and how extreme it is.   Addiction comes in all forms and we all have something good or bad we use.
 
Replied By: mcleen1953 on Jul 24, 2012, 9:08AM
I never post to things like this but I am appalled with that mother.  I'm sure you will find out that she ignored her daughter and the daughter feels unloved.  She is so into herself and has no time to deal with her daughters issues that she caused.  This young lady will not want to be with her mom when this is over.  I feel so sorry for the daughter but she needs tough love now and a dose of reality.  Good luck Doctors.  This one is tough
 
Replied By: pay189 on Jul 24, 2012, 4:19AM - In reply to weezy8150
I think too many people are making this woman seem innocent...she is selfish and out of touch with reality.  I too, saw the woe is me act with fake tears and arrogance with the man who is spending $250,000 on this idiot's precious fighter pilot drugged out prostitute daughter.  She needs to do some real soul searching and change her ways or she will send this young girl right back to the dope flop house that mom decided it was a good idea to bring ice cream and money to.  How dumb can you be???  You can bet your bottom dollar this girl didn't get up one morning and decide she was going to be a drugged out prostitute.  Dear, sweet ,innocent can't shed a tear Mom is probably loving all the attention she is getting and too stupid to know she is the reason this kid is running it into the ditch!!!  Yes the kid has to accept responsibility for her actions, but at this point, neither one of them has enough sense to get in out of the rain, at least the kid has an excuse.
 
Replied By: mndflnss on Jul 24, 2012, 1:03AM
In saying "How does a parent get over something like that?", the mother was saying, "I have been such an unaware/unhelpful parent that my daughter is not only addicted to drugs but prostituting herself; how can I live with myself, knowing that I've done something unforgiveable and with such awful consequences?" Her comment was tellingly couched in "I" terms (she's a narcissist), but I think it wasn't an entirely self-centered comment -- it contained a fair amount of self-reproach.

The mother is complicated. I'm not outright defending her -- clearly she's un-self-aware and oblivious to the needs of others (e.g., she said that she hasn't picked up on her daughter's feelings of isolation/not-belonging, from childhood on), but basically that tells us that the mother never learned how to be a connected, observant, caretaking, fully present parent. In an English-speaking household, the kids learn to speak English -- and in a household with parents who don't know how to be emotionally/psychologically present and truthful, the kids grow up to run from psychological/emotional pain (daughter via drugs, Mom via Macy's and work and haircuts and other day-planner stuff that serves her intense need for denial).

Reiterating that I’m not thrilled with the mother, but I think we shouldn't vilify her, in part because most of us aren't taught to be emotionally/psychologically present (and because nothing in consumer society rewards or reinforces psychological/emotional wholeness). Think about everyone in your life, from loved ones to co-workers to strangers in the supermarket or on the highway -- can you honestly say that society is more healthy than diseased?

As someone else wrote, let's pray for the mother and the daughter -- and let's work on being more self-aware, more accepting/forgiving (of self and others), more helpful, more present.
 
Replied By: mndflnss on Jul 24, 2012, 12:59AM - In reply to d8lirium
In saying "How does a parent get over something like that?", the mother was saying, "I have been such an unaware/unhelpful parent that my daughter is not only addicted to drugs but prostituting herself; how can I live with myself, knowing that I've done something unforgiveable and with such awful consequences?" Her comment was tellingly couched in "I" terms (she's a narcissist), but I think it wasn't an entirely self-centered comment -- it contained a fair amount of self-reproach.

The mother is complicated. I'm not outright defending her -- clearly she's un-self-aware and oblivious to the needs of others (e.g., she said that she hasn't picked up on her daughter's feelings of isolation/not-belonging, from childhood on), but basically that tells us that the mother never learned how to be a connected, observant, caretaking, fully present parent. In an English-speaking household, the kids learn to speak English -- and in a household with parents who don't know how to be emotionally/psychologically present and truthful, the kids grow up to run from psychological/emotional pain (daughter via drugs, Mom via Macy's and work and haircuts and other day-planner stuff that serves her intense need for denial).

Reiterating that I’m not thrilled with the mother, but I think we shouldn't vilify her, in part because most of us aren't taught to be emotionally/psychologically present (and because nothing in consumer society rewards or reinforces psychological/emotional wholeness). Think about everyone in your life, from loved ones to co-workers to strangers in the supermarket or on the highway -- can you honestly say that society is more healthy than diseased?

As someone else wrote, let's pray for the mother and the daughter -- and let's work on being more self-aware, more accepting/forgiving (of self and others), more helpful, more present.
 
Showing 1-10 of total 144 Comments