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2010 Shows

 
Parents: What should you do when you feel your child’s rights have been violated? Twelve-year-old Alexa made headlines when she was arrested for doodling on her desk at school. Her mother, Moraima, says she feels outraged and helpless by the incident. Areva Martin, attorney and author of The Everyday Advocate, weighs in. Then, dramatic surveillance video captures a mute, autistic 14-year-old boy being dragged out of a classroom and placed in a dark room. Hear how his father, Vikas, responds. And, a technique known as prone restraint is being used in schools across the country to subdue out-of-control students. Is this method discipline or abuse? Dr. Phil examines the story of an eighth grader who died after he was physically restrained by a teacher.

Find out what happened on the show.
Comments
Replied By: chattigirl on Aug 1, 2011, 11:23PM
My grandson is 6 yrs old, soon to be 7 in Sept. He should be in 1st grade this year but hasn't went to kindergarten yet.  He is high functioning in the upper part of the spectrum.  We have watched him come so far in the past couple or 3 yrs with the help of PACT in home classes and also one yr in early childhood class, which he really loved. We called ahead to take him to the pre-k class so he could see and we could see what he would be going into. We(my daughter, austin and I) went, the teacher let us in and never said a word. We then walked over to where the younger ones were at and they were having story time. Austin heard the teaches aid ask how many penguins there were on that page and he just told her and was correct and she praised him. Austin is very well behaved anywhere you take him and was that day as well.  We got ready to leave, and i felt like i could be better than what the teacher was by thanking her for letting us visit there class.  So I looked at Austin and said can you tell the teacher thank you for letting us visit.  Then i said ty to her. She looked at us and said you know he will have to tow the mark in this class just like everyone else does.  He did nothing in the classroom except be very well behaved.  She already knew about him being Autistic and that she may have him in her class the coming yr. Now comes the kicker to it all.
When it came time to register him, we did not have all his documentation, mainly the birth certificate they wanted and was having trouble with finances to even get it.  they told my daughter that he had to have it or could not be registered and had to be there by friday... no later.. no exceptions.  My daughters cousin went up on Monday and register her lil boy for same class and didn't have his birth cert and some other stuf and they registered him,  It made me very angry and I called the school and asked if they discriminate... of course they said no... i said you have just been busted and when i mentioned what happened she was almost silent.. i also told her she needed to be careful as there are laws against that... and felt like they didn't want him in there school.
They had a regular kindergarten class then a class of about 5 studenst.. special needs kids.  We wanted him put in the kindergarten class with a one on one aide (for only as long as needed).  They wanted him in the other with all older kids than him.  He is very smart and we felt he would picking up so many different things and be more confusing for him.  IEP mtg wouldn't happen til after he was in that class for at least 2 weeks. in that amt of time I feel it could be worse on him.  I believe you should give them a chance at there level and if they can't make it then you try other things or other class. He speaks very well, even uses some pretty big words in the right context of his sentences. There was no problem with behavior in the early childhood class at all, the teacher said he was a big help with the other kids.  He is very precious and I am so afraid he may start to regress because of this. He started Bible school tonite and i was told by my 18 yr old grandaughter that he did very well except for the music and he covered his ears. He doesn't like music or real loud noise. He has been on the computer for probably 3 yrs at least and does very well on it.  Learned many of the dinasaurs real names and lots about them. Learned on sesame street and nick jr online too.  My daughter does not want to send him to school here now as she doesn't want him to be treated bad or different.  Tuition to the next towns school is almost 8 thousand a year of which there is no way we could do that one.  The school here is a small one, our town is like 1200 in population.  It is so unfair that our children with special needs are treated like outcasts.  If only you could meet him you would know what i mean about his deserving so much more.   I just had to write and ask your opinion on this matter and autism.  Don't know what i really expect except maybe someone to understand where we are coming from. We are so blessed to have this wonderful child... and it breaks my heart to see ignorant people that call themselves educators treat them the way they do. Thank you so much for your time.
 
Replied By: lambriggs on Aug 18, 2010, 2:08PM
This is a growing problem in our schools.According to the ACLU,statistics show that in the 2006 -2007  school year out of 220,000 children in school that were corporally punished ,42,000 of these students were disabled.They were being punished for  for behaviors  that was a result of their disability. That was a few years ago.I'm sure the numbers have gone up since then..I am currently doing a thesis on this very subject.I also have a 15 year old son with Asperger Syndrome.It has been literally hell over the past 10 years in dealing with the school systems.My son has been bullied by teachers and other children, put in ISS, OSS, and even arrested. All due to teaching staff and principals not having the patience or knowledge on how to effectively  deal with these kids. The schools do not understand these children,have no patience for them,and do not know how to properly discipline them.There is a bill in the Senate right now about this very problem.It is called the "Preventing Harmful Restraint and Seclusion in Schools Act.This not only covers children with disabilities,but every child in the school systems.Everyone needs to Call their Senators and voice their opinions on the Bill.What also needs addressed is to have this Bill cover Private schools and also IEP Plans for the disabled children.Alot of times parents are bullied by the schools to include restraint and seclusions in these IEP plans for disabled children to keep them in school.This is so wrong.There are thousands of  documented incidents of seclusion and restraint that have resulted in injuries and death.We have to stand up for our children.If we as parents treated our children in this way ,we would have been arrested.The school systems should have to also be held accountable for their actions against our children. These abusive actions have got to stop.I work in a County Jail.WE do not treat inmates this way.It is against the law for us as Correctional Officers to corporally punish an inmate.We would be held accountable for our actions if we did so .So why do the schools have the right to administer corporal punishment ?
 
Replied By: htbsmith on May 5, 2010, 1:53PM
My uncle was a teaching Principle in a school that had 6 grades in 3 rooms.  It was a small farm town where many of the parents of his students didn't go past the 6th grade as they had to work the farms to help out the family. There was this one student that decide to crave his name into his desk .  Will my uncle called the parents and made arrangements for this boy to take the desk home on the bus to sand it down and refinish it over the weekend and return to school with it on Monday. The parents thought it was a good idea and the child did it lessen  learned no one else craved in the desk. 
 
Replied By: loriashley on Apr 26, 2010, 12:18PM
As a parent of both an autistic son and a typical daughter, I really understand the challenges this family is going through. When I heard the statistic that 85 - 90% of marriages with an autistic child end in divorce, my heart was broken.
Many parents lose sight of being husbands and wives, men and women, lovers first when they have children, and dealing with a special needs child amplifies that even more. I cannot stress enough that the mother who is willing to give up everything for her son to get the services he needs, is in fact giving up what he really needs the most - a solid foundation at home with two parents who love each other and work together. The best speech therapist, cutting edge treatment, or medical advancement cannot compare to the benefits of providing a safe, loving, protective environment at home. Their child will struggle through so many things in this life, even with early intervention, but knowing that he can come home to a family that will support him through the teasing from kids at school, that will wipe his tears when he can't find the words, and knows that no matter what he faces in this life, he has a predictable, consistent environment at home that will always be there for him is priceless. The best gift they can give him is to figure out how to be a husband and wife first, and a parent second. While it may seems selfish to do so, it is actually the most important thing in the child's life as it has the greatest affect on his development. And, I do not want to overlook their other child. As Dr Phil has said before, children have the unique ability to make everything their fault. That little girl will already take on an amazing amount of responsibility for her brother. Having the stress of feeling as though she is responsible for her parents marriage and then to take care of her brother during a divorce, is more than a child should ever have to handle. For their children's sake and for their own future, they owe it to him to put 110% into their marriage first so they can focus on giving him the best chance at this life. And - I speak to you from "in the trenches." I have had to fight for my marriage, my son, my daughter, and my sanity for the last 11 years and I will continue to do so one day, (sometimes one hour) at a time. Hang in there! We are blessed to be raising such beautiful, unique human beings.
 
Replied By: loriashley on Apr 26, 2010, 12:16PM
As a parent of both an autistic son and a typical daughter, I really understand the challenges this family is going through. When I heard the statistic that 85 - 90% of marriages with an autistic child end in divorce, my heart was broken.
Many parents lose sight of being husbands and wives, men and women, lovers first when they have children, and dealing with a special needs child amplifies that even more. I cannot stress enough that the mother who is willing to give up everything for her son to get the services he needs, is in fact giving up what he really needs the most - a solid foundation at home with two parents who love each other and work together. The best speech therapist, cutting edge treatment, or medical advancement cannot compare to the benefits of providing a safe, loving, protective environment at home. Their child will struggle through so many things in this life, even with early intervention, but knowing that he can come home to a family that will support him through the teasing from kids at school, that will wipe his tears when he can't find the words, and knows that no matter what he faces in this life, he has a predictable, consistent environment at home that will always be there for him is priceless. The best gift they can give him is to figure out how to be a husband and wife first, and a parent second. While it may seems selfish to do so, it is actually the most important thing in the child's life as it has the greatest affect on his development. And, I do not want to overlook their other child. As Dr Phil has said before, children have the unique ability to make everything their fault. That little girl will already take on an amazing amount of responsibility for her brother. Having the stress of feeling as though she is responsible for her parents marriage and then to take care of her brother during a divorce, is more than a child should ever have to handle. For their children's sake and for their own future, they owe it to him to put 110% into their marriage first so they can focus on giving him the best chance at this life. And - I speak to you from "in the trenches." I have had to fight for my marriage, my son, my daughter, and my sanity for the last 11 years and I will continue to do so one day, (sometimes one hour) at a time. Hang in there! We are blessed to be raising such beautiful, unique human beings.
 
Replied By: slester on Apr 25, 2010, 10:06AM
As a special educator with 31 years experience, I have seen times when I have had to restrain a child to keep him safe or the others in the class safe. I was a little defensive at the beginning of the show and felt that teachers were taking an unfair hit. 

We now have to write into a child's IEP if restraints are a possibility.  I have written that into one IEP of a student who had a history of leaving school grounds. I think restraints should be a last resort and teachers need more training in the use of restraints.
 
Replied By: rocky1005 on Apr 23, 2010, 7:11PM - In reply to kaydensmom2
In response to the comment I have previously made, I agree with you that staff in special needs classrooms need to want to be doing this job...but they also need to have some skills!  Even the most devoted, best intentions are not enough!!  Obviously the teacher that removed the children from the classroom when the student was having a temper tantrum was not teaching in a special needs classroom.  What he did was great for a regular classroom.  In a special needs classroom with students that are physically not able to move independantly, moving the child  to a safe room is ideal for everyone.  This is common sense to me...and the information (and spelling) in your response to my comment  is very telling as to your common sense and education.  Again, I encourage you to seek information and education....children do the best they can!!
 
Replied By: kaydensmom2 on Apr 23, 2010, 3:26PM - In reply to rocky1005
I have been in a special needs classroom for over 2 years now. We have a boy who is SEVERELY autistic and weighs 156 pounds at only 9 years old. He has no speach and is very violent to himself and to anyone around him. I totally understand when the teacher of the year guy says he can remove the other children from danger without touching the child throwing a temper tantrum....but I am sorry with 10 kids some of them are paralized and may be sitting out of their wheel chair....how exactly is one suppose to get everyone out of the room and allow that disruption when that is all this little boy wants...a reaction. That is why the sensory rooms and 'quiet rooms' have been made! To put the children who need to be isolated in to calm down. When this little boy throws a fit, and may I also add that it occurs about every 15 minutes....whoever and whatever is in his way is going down. To get him from point a to point B you do have to not so much restrain him but make sure that you are safe...by holding his arms away from him with his hands away from you (otherwise he will scratch) As well when his temper tantrums happen every 15 minutes....how exactly are you suppose to get everyone away from him every 15 minutes. What is the point? There are reasons people do restrain children other reasons are that they are hitting themselves...scratching themselves or causing themselves danger. Of course there is NO reason for them to be hurt in the prosess and that is the reason restraint should occur is to make sure they are not being in danger! It is a tough job to work everyday in a special needs class but there are tips and tools you learn along the way. If it isn't your job you shouldn't be doing it. But parents should know that if your child is going to hurt a staff that the staff have to make sure they arn't getting hurt either. But within reason.
 
Replied By: rocky1005 on Apr 23, 2010, 2:10PM
This show was heartbreaking and did a great service to the public about what can happen is schools around the world.  I do believe that teachers have one of the most difficult jobs in the world, but also one of the most rewarding.  I am sure that all teachers start out in the profession with the very best intentions, and most continue on that path throughout their careers.  Children that are not thriving in the classroom benefit from teachers that seek out professional guidance and support.  One of the many professionals that has excellent resources for teachers and parents is Dr. Ross W. Greene.  His books "Lost at School" and "The Explosive Child" are perfect for any teacher or parent that is struggling with a child.  His practical, collabrative problem solving approach can be practised in countless situations.  I have used it for a few years and it really works!  Dr. Greene also provides excellent workshops and seminars, if he is in your area plan to attend.  As far as restraining children, the caregivers should be trained by a professional organization that requires recertification on a yearly basis.  Kids do well if they can, and if what your doing isn't working, then the adult needs to change what they are doing. 
 
Replied By: teacherldy1 on Apr 23, 2010, 12:26PM - In reply to kssmlt
That's right, we're too lazy.  Except that's not it.  We have 30 plus kids in our classroom.  The other 29 can behave and it's your responsibility to get your child to behave.  It's my responsibility (as your child's teacher) to make sure he/she is in a safe environment where he/she is LEARNING all of the things that we are required to teach so they can be an adult  with an education who can function in society.  Not to babysit for you.  If you want someone to help you with your child's behavior, call Nanny 911.
 
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