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2010 Shows

 
The headline news stories surrounding convicted rapist and serial killer Rodney Alcala and sex offender John Albert Gardner III have caused many people to wonder: What's wrong with our justice system? Through court appeals, Alcala was able to successfully overturn two previous death penalties before being sentenced to death again, for a third time, last Tuesday. Why did the system let Alcala slip through the cracks so many times? Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas and local TV reporter Dave Lopez weigh in. Then, Gardner stands accused of the murder of 17-year-old Chelsea King. Why was he allowed back on the streets to possibly strike again? Is the system that is supposed to be protecting us, failing us? Dr. Phil delves into these stories and into the minds of killers and sex offenders to examine what drives them to such heinous acts. And, how do the surviving victims and family members pick up the pieces?  It’s an important Dr. Phil you don’t want to miss.

Find out what happened on the show.
Comments
Replied By: bexbennett on Sep 30, 2013, 5:59PM
I have always been disgusted with our 'justice' system. I believe it puts more value on money and material items than lives. The victims are tormented whilst the rapists, sexual abusers and murderers rights are valued and protected. Everyone is in agreement that a person must have a fair trial but when people like this serial rapist/attempted murderer is caught in the act and is obviously guilty he should have gone to prison for life. 17 months????? its insane and an insult to the victim and all those affected by the crime and even the police officers who work tirelessly to bring these Monsters to justice. anyone who harms people or animals should go to prison for life and if the prisons are too full then put them to death. I included  animals by the way because I believe harming animals is a stepping stone to abuse of humans. I don't believe in rehabilitation. Theres no evidence to support it effectiveness. Thoses guilty of a violent crime should never walk the streets again.  
 
Replied By: bexbennett on Sep 30, 2013, 4:29PM
I have always been disgusted with our 'justice' system. I believe it puts more value on money and material items than lives. The victims are tormented whilst the rapists, sexual abusers and murderers rights are valued and protected. Everyone is in agreement that a person must have a fair trial but when people like this serial rapist/attempted murderer is caught in the act and is obviously guilty he should have gone to prison for life. 17 months????? its insane and an insult to the victim and all those affected by the crime and even the police officers who work tirelessly to bring these Monsters to justice. anyone who harms people or animals should go to prison for life and if the prisons are too full then put them to death. I included  animals by the way because I believe harming animals is a stepping stone to abuse of humans. I don't believe in rehabilitation. Theres no evidence to support it effectiveness. Thoses guilty of a violent crime should never walk the streets again.  
 
Replied By: mobster on Mar 21, 2011, 10:45AM - In reply to kathcus
The biggest business in the world - I have missed It, I am not part of it, - an outsider.
About 500 biljon business in the world and the bank's and Capital workers don´t know were they put the money in to, before it is to late. Hokes and punishment is dayly reality and the legals get free Vip and earning about 30% or more to shut up.
Why don´t we all shut up and survive-The cups normaly somehow get on to the other side of the border.
Female cups becomes VIP. And then they lay down the case.
It´s a mans world. 97% of all the money in the world is own by men.
Money make men feel more male.
I have missed participation in the business.
Hopefully you missed it to.
Taxpeople normaly don´t know were the taxmoney come from, more than a paper.
A 95 year old man I used to know was fighting for womens libaration. To legalize the females - take  charge by men and pay taxes and get legal help from doctors with there helth.
He died for some years ago - During his lifetime he did his best for women all over the world - with the comment: `"It´s the only way women can get ritch" - He never touched me. But some beautiful poems is left in my hart. He loved Madonna and Nina Hagen too and wanted the hole world to become a Matriarchate. He loved women. I miss his entertaining phone calls after his trips, when I was listening to everything he wanted to tell me and the hole world. I hope he is forgiven in his haven. /Mobster's 
 
Replied By: intent on Jun 21, 2010, 5:15AM - In reply to kathcus
There is only one way to handle it: size down the sex offender registry to only individuals who have gone through risk assesment  to see if they are deemed dangerous, by a panel of psychologists/socioligists etc. Then if the judge agrees,put them on the list. Everyone else should perhaps be in a profile somewhere, yet not on a public access site. The registry is blotted,defeated its own purpose and is merley a scarlett letter to hang on people. It makes posturing politicans look good, gives the media fodder for sensationalized sex scandal stories yet tradgically provides cover and camoflague for real predators ,who hide in the registry amongst an ocean of statutory,sexting,consensual and other non sense,non violent cases.

No one cares,no one has the courage to make a public statement,and the killing will continue as the real predators  have the same police monitoring as a teenage statutory case,. I should know,as you all know my husband is on the registry for dating me when i was underage.Fine,yet  I am 27 years old now,the police still come over to check up on Mark and we have 2 children together, Then they go down the street and check up on a predator who had sex with an infant. Pretty ridiculous,even the cops often comment on how ridiculous this registry is. Thats what we all get for not getting involved in the laws being passed in this country!!!!!!!.
 
Replied By: ozmanofpeace on May 7, 2010, 12:06AM
Look, everyone's wasting their time unless they're prepared to tackle the SOURCE of the problem.
If you truly want to make a major difference in sex offences, you need to destroy the sources that influence, warp and contort a person's mind - i'm talking about pornography in all its forms.
There's no doubt that the freely available access to porn (of greater and greater perversions) plays a MAJOR role in actions of sex offenders. Look at the material they are viewing on a daily basis - the way in which its presented, the associated neural stimulis-pleasure pathways that get formed and strongly reinforced, giving the viewer 'highs', and look at it over a 10-20 year period. That kind of influence HAS to affect a person's mental condition and the way they see females AND males. It doesn't matter what you do to the law if the seeds are being nourished every day with such a potent fertilizer.

But will the government ban pornography? Of course it won't - American's would rather have their 'free speech' and 'freedom of expression' than face the only serious solution.

In an imperfect world, you'll always have crime, including sexual crime, by nature of mental defects and mental health issues (unlearnt, that is, cerebral defects and anomalies that lead to criminal behavour, rather than those traits and behaviours that are learnt over time). But I'm convinced the majority of these crimes are perpetrated by people who get caught up the mind-warping effects of porn (who would otherwise NOT commit these crimes ie they are learnt behaviours).

Changing the law is a bandaid solution. The real solution requires severe surgery to cut the rot out of its victims (and yes, I think the perpetrators are also victims, especially those with poor mental ability or self control to begin with).

But will porn ever be banned? I highly doubt it. So rant all you want about laws and sentences - the problem is only going to get worse as technology gets faster, more accessible, and more pervasive.

And don't get me started on the media - they play a HUGE role in the formation of sexual offenders, and general criminal behaviour for that matter.

Who knows what kind of tax benefits the porn industry has for the government?

Do the research yourselves - look at countries where pornography isn't freely accessible or available, and the proportionately small number of sexual crimes committed as a result.
 
Replied By: kathcus on Apr 28, 2010, 9:50AM - In reply to intent
Proponents of sex offender registration and community notification believe they protect children in two ways: police have a list of likely suspects should a sex crime occur in the neighborhood in which a registered offender lives, and parents have information that will enable them to heighten their vigilance and to warn their children to stay away from particular people. Sex offender laws are based on preventing the horrific crimes that inspired them. However, many agree that the sex offender registry is ill conceived, and in many cases, to some innocent individuals, harmful. The public believes everyone on a sex offender registry is dangerous, but the definition of sex offender has expanded to the point of being so broad, it's oftentimes meaningless. In many cases the list includes individuals convicted of consensual sex between teenagers, prostitution, public urination, and "sexting (this is when individuals, often teenagers, send nude photos of themselves, or others, via cell phone).

Many of the existing federal laws exacerbate the problems with state sex offender laws. It forces states to either dramatically increase the scope and duration of registration and community notification restrictions - including requiring states to register individuals as young as 14 - or lose some federal law enforcement grant money. Compliance with these laws may preclude states from adopting more carefully calibrated and cost-effective registration and community notification policies. This may complicate well-meaning societal goals to promote justice and make our children any safer. Children are not going to be safer by artificially inflating sex offender rolls with individuals who don’t belong on the list in the first place.  That just leads to fear, confusion, and a misplaced sense of justice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
Replied By: intent on Apr 1, 2010, 8:28PM


I am on the sex offender registry for having a consensual relationship with my now wife, in 1998.We now have two beautiful children.There is an answer to the question ",why cant the police watch these guys and prevent future horrors."?
The answer is not what people want to hear as this subject is driven by hysteria and knee jerk legislation to appease a roman colliseum,  mob type mentality.  The answer surely cannot come out of the mouth of registered offenders as well!!!!
There are thousands and thousands of consensual,statutory cases on the sex offender registry in each state,Plus juvenille cases(16 year olds with 15 year olds) ,public nudity,exposure,prostitution,indecent behavior,public peeing etc.  
There simply are not enough police to monitor all these cases. Because the states wont interject rick assessment hearings, all sex offender registrants are lumped together and there simply isnt enough police power to monitor all registrants,nor should they.!!!!!!!!
I have been on television numerous times on this subject. I know what i did is socially taboo and  illegal, yet i am not a threat to children or women.To put me next to a child rapist on this list, is like putting a casual marijuanna smoker ,caught with a bag, in the same arena s a meth lab gangster!!!!!!!.  

ive been on this list for 11 plus years,ive had 100 probation appointments,40 plus home checks,police monitoring our home,pulled over (with my wife,both of us in cuffs)12 times etc.Stickers on our home on Halloween,lost 6 jobs,acts of vigilantism etc. All this police time for one consensual case.!!!!
( We were even married by the same judge who gave me the original misdimeanor,who did not consider me a threat!!! )

If the public is wondering why law enforcement cant even stop violent registered offenders from re-offending,the answer is that these predators are like a pin hiding in a haystack.The haystack is thousands of non violent cases like mine, that would be removed immediately if risk assessment was employed. 
No media figure has the courage to tell it straight: time to weed out the predators from the registrants who simply broke the law.   Then the police can triple their time up on monitoring violent offenders.
But this wont happen,because the media likes to cry wolf,get the public excited (for sensationalism)and then the lawmakers legislate an already blotted system while the real predators know this and use it in their hunting techniques as camoflague.  
my name is Mark Perk, l Google in"  Lets seperate the Misguided from the monsters" Eric Zorn ,Chicago tribune. This is our story.  

our daughter is 4 years old,ironically I am as scared  as anyone of true sexual predators. your story was heart breaking ,frightening yet tragically will happen time and time again. No one has the courage to seperate the wheat from the chaff.  Mark and Krissy Perk
 
Replied By: sherrifromcolo on Mar 30, 2010, 1:11PM
I loved that you ended the show by allowing the families a few moments to honor their murdered  loved one.  It's giving the family the last word and not the monster who killed them.  It's a lasting impression that the victim is a real human being with familes who love them and miss them.

I had a dear friend brutally murdered 20+ years ago.  The man who did it was caught and is serving prison time currently. I was about 20 years old when it happened.   I am still in touch with her mother, but have always been afraid to talk about her daughter.  I never wanted to upset her.  I have always carried some guilty feelings that I have gone on living, got married, had kids, etc.   This story made me realize how important it is for the family to get to tell what they love and miss about the one victimized.  I can't wait to honor her daughter by opening the conversation and allowing her to tell me all about her daughter.  We grew up together, so maybe I'll get to tell her the naughty things we did as kids that she doesn't know about.
 
Replied By: happy2bme123 on Mar 26, 2010, 10:13PM - In reply to sylvina
I just watched the Mar.17th show. My daughter is a victim of sexual assault by her bio father. This happened many years ago. She just said yesterday as we were in court being granted an Order for Protection for her;  that it is no wonder why victims of sexual assault do not come forward as there are little rights or protections for the victims and their family. There are some protections(there needs to be more), you just need to educate yourself about those rights and do not hesitate to enforce those rights. My daughter and our family have been harassed for years by her perps family. We do not let them or the assault comsume our life. She would not take coming forward back. She wanted to save her sister and brother from that harm and they have thanked for that. She has healed and moved on but it took work. As a sexual assault advocate, I have to say, you should always come forward and remember it was never the victims fault. Its hard to heal if you keep it to yourself.If more of us come together and fight for stronger laws this could get better. Please remember that April is sexual assault awareness month and do what you can in your area.Thanks and Take Care
 
Replied By: speckintime on Mar 21, 2010, 11:30PM
Pride goes before a fall Is what's been said

When people play god innocence is shed

When truth no longer is the fight

Right and wrong go out of sight

And a game created not to protect the weak

But challenge the keepers cunning ability to speak

Convict the innocent let the guilty go free

Mastery of the craft is the only importance they see

So the devil sent his beast to play

While the keepers looked the other way

The beast got bolder with every step

Feasting on the keepers neglect

For they were too busy playing law

A weakness the beast so easily saw

As boldness grew fear went away

An innocent child would be the one to pay

The keepers said were not to blame

We were doing our jobs we didn't cause the pain

And the age old adage is just as touching

That "evil prevails when good people do nothing"

 
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